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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
win it. do appreciate all you do for prostate cancer as well. >> hillary clinton is no longer secretary of state and bid farewell to staff and friends at the state department. >> i am so grateful that we have had a chance to contribute in each of our ways to making our country and our world stronger, safer, fairer, and better. >> what will be clinton's legacy at state? let's go to the war room. strategist richard goodstein and republican strategist joe watkins, an aide to george h.w. bush. let me start with you. hillary clinton left as an extremely popular secretary of state and griacing news week's cover calling her the most powerful woman in american history. that's a definitive declaration. >> close to it. there many powerful women in the united states and in the world, but hillary clinton is easily one if not the most powerful. her career has been extraordinary. not only first lady, but a u.s. senator and secretary of state and somebody who could be again a candidate for the presidency in 2016. >> she came under fire for the attack on the consulate in ben gazay that left f
consulate could not sustain an attack. senator graham wanted to know why secretary clinton testified she never saw that cable. >> i don't know that she didn't know about the cable. >> she said she didn't. >> then -- >> are you stunned that she didn't? >> i would call myself surprised that she didn't. >> senator mccain asked about the u.s. providing weapons to the syrian opposition. >> did you support the recommendation by secretary of state, then secretary of state clinton and then head of c.i.a. general petraeus that we provide weapons to the resistance in syria? do you support that? >> we did. >> last weekend the "new york times" reported clinton and petraeus asked the white house last summer for permission to arm the veerian rebels. senator rand paul hinted last week that the annex in benghazi benefiting may have been involved in moving weapons from libya to syria via turkey. chris? >> jennifer griffin reporting from the pentagon. thanks. let's get reaction now from the vice chair of the senate intelligence committee, georgia republican sax by chambliss. you were busy in both hearings
in the south china sea. i daresay as interesting as it may sound, and my present -- secretary clinton who made her first trip to asia, i have heard rumors to the effect incoming secretary of state kerry will make its first trip to the middle east. we are going to pivot to asia,. back to the middle east seems to repave it. host: -- repivot. host: u.s. sanctions are proving counterproductive. the economy is in ruins. the countrydeadlocked in the cos heading toward sectarian breakup. the grim prognosis for syria is provided by the latest report provided by the state department working with the free syrian army. guest: i admire him and i know he has been writing quite a bit about him lately. he is symptomatic of the disease that has set into washington, which is a new-found interest in syria. when the revolution began, to find voices of concern over syria was a virtually impossible treasure hunt. we were expressing deep concern than that unless we involve ourselves, when i say involved, i will be careful -- once we did what we could politically to get the disparate opposition groups more organized
, secretary clinton did, which mandated or agreed that there would be a political transition, that there would be opposition and government members of that transition and that the makeup would have to be mutually agreed to. of course it going to be mutually agreed to, you know the opposition would not have had assad going in this going forward that is where the breakdown of the russians has taken place. we continue to engage with them, meet with them regularly, we have not come to an agreement on a political way forward here. i hope we can do that. >> in the near term. >> well, i think the sooner the better as i said. now during the course of this year, the president will have the opportunity to meet with president putin on a number of occasions beginning this spring. >> but aren't you going to see putin soon wince i think i will visit russia in the next month. >> and see putin. >> yes. >> what do you want to come out of that and did you reset the relationship so that it's more likely that you can have, because if you have good big power understanding it gives you more leverage to deal with th
's welcome back president bush had it his second term. president clinton below. how do you have him handle the rest? >> he will do what he has been doing. you use the word "confrontational." i would use a different word. they will be very familiar themes. the economy will be central and how we can grow it. so everybody can participate. fair shot, pay your fair share but other things that he does lay out, he'll lay out the looming deadline on the sequester and tough choices we have to make around it and consequences if we let the sequester go into effect and, you know, cuts to some pretty critical programs, so i think the state of the union is always an important moment in a presidency, not just another case for the people sitting in the room but the country of the tough choices we have to make and i think he'll make it. >> nicolle, a cautionary tale on the state of the union. >> i think that he made the proposal to reform social security without having his own party on board. that's a lesson for any president, but i think president obama did the republican party a huge favor by delivering
is now a professor at the harvard business school, former fha director in the clinton years, was certainly one of the most voluble players in the commission. i also want to point out senator alfonzo jackson. please stand and be recognized. [applause] i want to turn the podium back over to senator george mitchell. >> years ago, when bob dole, howard baker, tom daschle, and i gathered to establish the bipartisan by -- bipartisan policy center, we were dismayed to the extent to which our political process appeared to be in gridlock as a consequence of excessive partisanship and ideological posturing. that concern is heightened today. i frequently cite the example of the presidential campaign of 1800 when jefferson supporters called president adams a hermaphrodite, lacking, they said, the strength of a man or the gentleness of a woman. supporters said that its jefferson were elected, robbery, rape, and murder would be openly taught and practiced in our country. it was rough and tough when we were there, but it has gotten proper and tupper today. we at the bipartisan policy cente
the previous eight years of the bush administration and the previous eight years of clinton administration. i can continue to go back, so i do not think they he are serious about negotiating. it just gives them more time. >> reporter: the general says the u.s. along with other nations should use covert operations to thwart iran's nuclear development. gregg? >> molly henneberg. thanks. >>> the white house says it expects the senate to confirm president obama's nominee for defense secretary. white house press secretary jay carney defending former republican senator chuck hagel saying that he will be an excellent pentagon chief. now, this comes after a fiery confirmation hearing with members of the senate armed services committee. he faced some tough questions including this one from senator james imhoff. >> why do you think the rainan foreign ministry strongly supports your nomination to be the secretary of defense? >> i have a difficult enough time with american politics senator. i have no idea, but thank you. >> senators could vote as early as this week. washington times columnist charlie hur
institute, were not capable of doing that. that's a historic reality. in the 1990s when bill clinton said there's an election based on that, it was the house and senate that legislative sanctions on iran, the push for, like it or not, freedom for the iraqi people to push for sanctions on cuba, to push her more engagement and exactly which are talking about, that really pushed for in a relationship with india. i could go on and on. nato expansion. all the things taken for granted but not in initiative. they're members of congress on capitol hill who change the world in a very meaningful way and that's still an opportunity if we recognize we need to care about. sorry for that little speech. >> how do we know kind of the counterterrorism, is very much her? [inaudible] >> the question is how do we know when we've won? >> were in no danger of women anytime soon. this has become a sugarless because it's a fair question obviously. what you measure for success and how do we know when we stopped, and that we are so far away from that now a more further away than when this president took office in
change in russia's policy? >> well, i think that one has to look back and remember that hillary clinton had exactly the same experience with the rebels in libya. there was a period of time where the rebels used every meeting as a potential negotiating ploy for what they wanted to extract from britain, france, and the united states, and you also have, i would say, greater diversity in the syrian opposition and more inconsistencies in the broad syrian opposition than you even had in libya. libya was not great. what we're seeing is standard fare. it's not anything unusual. i think where it goes is that john kerry is going to go in and, you know, basically offer a lot of resolve, perhaps more posturing, but the syrian knot continues to be something that i think that the president wants to remain from being deeply engaged in, and i don't think he is going to turn the switch on for heavy arms transfers to the opposition, so i suspect more of the same with a little bit more toughing rhetoric that assad needs to leave, but when it comes to what the syrian rebels most want, nothing really new. >
do, sir. >> we were asked to go to iraq by senator clinton to see if we could push the iraqis to make sure we got legal protection to our troops. when the prime minister said, how many are you going to recommend, i turn to you and you said, i believe we are still working on that. the recall that conversation? >> yes, i do. >> it was not sent general austin did not know what he needed. it was just that nobody would tell him what they would approve. general austin always had a firm view. i said, that may be more than the political market can bear. i am not insensitive about the fatigue back here at home. i know you were making the best recommendations you could. my problem is not with you, general austin. you put the numbers to paper and at the end of the day, we had none. i want to put into the record a load of articles about iraq. blood for oil. iraq's returned to bloodshed. -- return to bloodshed. i would like permission to put all of these articles into the record. i would like everybody to know general austin thought long and hard about the residual force. do you remember when you
fight, we have to drive. how would we know? bill clinton telling us at the second briefing before he went to camp david, trying and failing is better than not trying at all. i remember how inspired i was by that. that is an appropriate slogan for a college or high school football team. it is not a substitute for the most consequential power on earth. we get ourselves into trouble when we commit two since. one, the sin of on the contents. we think we can do everything. two, the transgression of omniscience. the debate between us has to do with the provision of military assistance and construction of a new fly zone. that is the debate here. let's not moralize this or turn it into a morality play. that is the question. i would argue that history, since you both invoked it, in the last decade, is on my side. you have to tell me why you think -- >> let's pick up on that point. reminder, we are tweaking it all. tweaking this very lively debate at #midebatesyria. are there any other syrian americans or syrian residents of the house? a we the you break it you bought it. do we get stuck polic
, and my present -- secretary clinton who made her first trip to asia, i have heard rumors to the effect incoming secretary of state kerry will make its first trip to the middle east. we are going to pivot to asia. going back to the middle east seems to repivot. host: john kerry's first task as secretary of state is to develop a coherent policy for syria where u.s. sanctions are proving counterproductive. the fighting around damascus is deadlocked in the country is heading toward sectarian breakup. the grim prognosis for syria is provided by the latest report provided by the state department working with the free syrian army. guest: i admire him and i know he has been writing quite a bit about him lately. he is symptomatic of the disease that has set into washington, which is a new-found interest in syria. when the revolution began, to find voices of concern over syria was a virtually impossible treasure hunt. we were expressing deep concern than that unless we involve ourselves, when i say involved, i will be careful -- once we did what we could politically to get the disparate oppositi
it was a new york times story that revealed last week that both secretary clinton and general petraeus then head of the cia, had also advocated sending arms to the rebels in the resistance in syria so now we have a situation where the entire national security team, secretary of defense, secretary of state, head of cia, chairman of joint chiefs of staff who all advocated sending weapons to these rebels so they could defend themselves, keeping in mind the russians are supplying assad including the revolutionary iranian guard on the ground. so what happened? obviously, the buck stopped with the president of the united states overruling the recommendation of the national security team that he appointed. really remarkable. >> greta: and i have a sorted related topic. everybody knows that you say torture doesn't work and the now the report about drones coming out of the justice department that americans thought to be terrorists on foreign soil can be essentially disintegrated by drones. your thought about this? >> my thought is two thoughts. one, because of this administration's policy, if y
.s. state department said he's gone in 36 hours and hillary clinton says his days are numbered, my day is numbered, too, how high the number is. he's supported by iran and they're sending him weapons and he's supported by russia and they're leaving him support at the united nations. he has a long way to go. >> the u.s. has not intervened in syria as we did in libya. as we did, know not militarily, but in egypt with the president of the united states coming and saying mubarak needs to go. >> what's the difference here? >> two things, you have the russian now protecting syria and the united nations and can't get the u.n. vote they tried to get. second you're learning after the third or fourth time. that the devil we know in terms of what the united states is looking at and israel is looking at is better than the devil we don't know. and the intelligence says that the syrian rebels often times have ties to al-qaeda and when you think about what libya had when the libyan revolution had. that's tonka toys with the systems ripped from hezbollah, back to the iranians, in terms of tanks, armor
senator kerry and senator hagel to senator -- then-senator hillary clinton and bob gates. by that standard both the new nominees lack gravitas. they're not independent thinkers, they have no track record of either legislating in an intellectual sense or advancing important ideas on military affairs or interor national politics. international politics. but the underlying cause, i would say, is it's a reflection to have president's lack of interest in these issues. >> anybody else? >> yeah. i've got another pet phrase to introduce into this discussion. the republican party is now focused on trying to be responsible about what kind of fiscal environment we leave to our children and grandchildren, which i think is good in general terms. and so we're very worried about the deficit. and what kind of deficit we're going to be leaving to our heirs. there was a national security deficit that is growing and that will continue to grow. it's a particularly american conceit that the world goes away or stops when we stop paying attention to it. the fact of the matter is that the problems that we see in
of cnn who together have a wonderful interview with clinton yesterday. thank you. over to elise. [applause] we have a lot of distinguished guests in the audience. the deputy chief of mission for the embassy of lebanon. a lot of people who care about syria and looks to be a lively discussion this evening. in august, 2011 secretary of state hillary clinton called for the president bashar al-assad to step down for the sake of the syrian people. at that time about 2,000 people were killed. today that number of u.n. estimates has risen to more than 60,000 syrian is dead, hundreds of thousands of refugees have fled to turkey and jordan and iraq pleasing burdens on those countries, close to 2 million more, more than half have been displaced inside syria. what started as a brave stand has moved into a civil war with opposition forces becoming more radicalized, some of them would say infiltrated by extremist forces with links to al qaeda. the conflict threatens to destabilize the entire region and become a battleground for the proxy war some might say of competing interest. the and ratio
not gotten the help they have sought. secretary clinton and secretary panetta recommended farming some of the rebel groups. a static policy cannot remain. at this stage, isn't it time to revisit the policy, and i want to ask what you mean by the policy? with the u.k. like to see the united states take a more forward-leaning policy towards arm and the rebels and giving them some help in our main, training, or other kinds of support? is there a way that the regime can be displaced given russia's support military and otherwise? >> i will answer your first question and let the secretary answer questions two, three, and four. why should they come and meet? because countries have been helping them and because we are precisely meeting to determine how to help assad change the calculation on the ground. i have said that he needs to be able to change his calculation. president obama has been engaged in examining the way that we may be able to contribute to that. that is the purpose of this meeting in rome. i would urge syria opposition to join us as a matter of practicality and informing us. i
and bill clinton 42 were getting along while president bush was still in office. you remember how nixon helped out everyone, from clinton to ford. this would be a great opportunity for president obama at some point, maybe even on tuesday, to say, a lot of the policies i was critical of as a senator, now that i'm in that seat, i can support and my respect goes out to george bush that. would go a long way to getting something done in washington. am i dreaming? >> yeah. this guy has never actually taken the olive branch and used it the way it should be. he wields it like a club and i don't think we'll have that moment. you're right, brian. this would be a time to say, you know what? i inherited these policies from bush and i'm actually glad. that's not going to happen. >> steve: he's adopted so many of george w. bush's policies, ironically, things he ran against and now he supports them. listen, let's talk a little bit about gun control. there was a rally recently and a very famous comedian was there and chris rock said this. >> president of the united states is, you know, our boss. he's a
a letter to president clinton showing unconditional support for the state of israel. i would argue his record when it comes to iran and vale and statements he made put him well out of the mainstream and "the washington post" is right on the fridge. and now is the time to have somebody on the fringe of iran and israel serving as secretary of defense for the reason. ly vote no. debate should continue and when we get back unless there's a bomb shell. thank you. >> thank you. i yield the floor. senator from michigan. >> yield five minutes for the senator of wfd. >> senator from west virginia. >>. >> madam president. proudly support chuck hagel for secretary of defense. if he can make it through the jungle of jamb. val. america needs chuck as secretary of defense to bring our troops home and keep our military the strong nest the world. he's an american hero. when so many americans were dodging the draft he volunteered to serve at vietnam. it gave him the option to return to college. he refused. he said, i think the best thing for me is to go in the army and t may not be the best thing for t
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)

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